Archive for April, 2014

Ceci n’est pas un Livre (this is not a book)

“The manner in which human sense perception is organized, the medium in which it is accomplished, is determined not only by nature but by historical circumstances as well” Walter Benjamin

Walter Benjamin wrote The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction in 1936. The rapid shift toward dynamic, industrialized modernity created a pervasive anxiety among artists and art lovers.  Could art be replaced by machines?  New photographic technology became the catalyst, carrying  fears surrounding visual art and, to some extent, perceptions of reality in of itself. Arguing that, in order for it to remain relevant, there needed to be a shift in how to understand art in a modern context. The themes of authenticity, tradition, ritual, value, mass production and proliferation of art are woven throughout the essay.

woman_readingIt is not surprising that similar conversations are occurring now surrounding the migration of the library’s print collections to digital platforms. Incorporating technology, “the machine,” into the library space is often viewed as being disruptive, inauthentic and contrary to the original intention of the 20th century library.

We are finding that these same themes brought forth by Benjamin in 1936 are entering our research process. How do we manage traditions and ritualistic expectations of library patrons? What is the value of the digital library? How do we connect technology with existing collections?

There remains a great deal of work for librarians to transform and create a new narrative for the printed book.  The historical context of the 21st century requires libraries to be creative, expanding on the idea of Ceci n’est pas un Livre . The bookwall is a design example that the library can use to highlight the idea of learning in the library.  

The overarching question remains: What type of machines do we allow into the Garden of Eden? Tell us what you think.

Please take our Academic Library Survey

Please take our Public Library Survey

We will be releasing data about the survey at our workshop “make the library an incubator for learning” on June, 5, 2014 @ Steelcase Worklife NYC

 

Image: René Magritte – La Lectrice soumise (1928)

, , , , , ,

No Comments

How Libraries and Learning Theory are Put into Practice

Librarians have the opportunity to guide patrons on their quest for research information, both online and in the stacks, gradually aligning the responsibility of the learning to the learner themselves. Directed learning activities (DLAs) can help academic libraries engage in active learning support.

Instituted by many college libraries and learning resource centers, students can build their skills through the completion of a series of practice activities. DLAs can be effective in teaching grammar, writing, computer technology, Internet navigation, the possibilities are endless.

In 1968 Malcolm Knowles projected the ancient Greek word “andragogy” into educational discourse, as the art and science of helping students learn. As opposed to pedagogy, andragogy focuses only on the adult learning experience. Terminology aside, in defining a way to reach adult learners educators provide differentiated learning strategies addressing how adults learn in contrast to how children learn.

Using Bloom’s Taxonomy and adult learning strategies, librarians can create a library service program that can both actively engage and promote cooperative learning amongst students. Libraries can help foster lifelong learning DLA’s to adults and assist with community college retention rates and remediation.

Shifting from directed learning strategies, libraries offer other opportunities for self-directed learning (SDL).  As a cornerstone of adult learning theory, SDL’s are dominant in the world of e-learning.  The development of hybrid and online courses; digital library archives that provide the learner with unique data mining opportunities. Libraries are natural places for self-directed inquiry and learning.

How can these adult learning strategies work toward economic growth?

Self-directed public library spaces can be a useful tool to help small businesses and individuals gain access to information; which in turn contributes to learning opportunities. Libraries provide a useful location for informed collaboration. With endless resources at your fingertips, the library can successfully put theory into practice.

ThomJlibhoriz Untitled-35

, , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

Learning About How Libraries Are Changing

It is normal for the community to question whether a library needs to grow, move or be reduced in size.  Libraries are transforming from print spaces into learning spaces.  The challenge is to build on the strengths of the library as a tool for learning and research support.  There are two areas where librarians are making a big impact:

1.  Embedded Librarianship
2.  Information Literacy

Embedded Librarianship is the integration of knowledge resources (people and online services) within a research program.

Information Literacy is locating research (general and specific) and making it available to the library’s community.

Both strategic service areas enable the library community to thrive and grow.

We are researching how libraries are transforming their environments to support their communities.  We want to learn how to make libraries reflective spaces, collaborative and social gathering centers of knowledge.

Please take our Library Planning Outcomes Survey:

Have you completed a building renovation in the last 10 years? We would really like to hear about the outcomes.

Take the Public Library Outcomes Survey

curic library

 

, , , , , ,

No Comments