Posts Tagged academic librarian planning

A Golden Opportunity for Knowledge Management

In the knowledge management world, demand for library services are not always directly observable. It’s worth emphasizing that digital collections are revealed through the use of communications and technology not on their own. This lack of a predictable user experience is a struggle many libraries confront of a daily basis. What about in the corporate world? Are they experiencing the same type of disconnection between the research product and the availability of that collaborative / sharing database product?

No matter how much excellent work the project team may be doing today – tomorrow their work will be left unorganized. It is up to knowledge management professionals to educate their users and raise the profile of digital collections (marketing or business related). It is time for the project team to build in a collaborative library services that can be used as a repository of working knowledge.

The structure of library communications can be modeled after our five modes of learning – reflective (self guides), collaborative (webinars), presentation (workshops), social (games) and touchpoint (service questions) to be modeled.

OUR SERVICES
Our knowledge management research team offers capabilities and institutional knowledge to help institutions develop their physical or virtual the service point, repository and collaborative work areas. We use communication strategies to build on the clients vision, creating an opportunity for the library user to explore and share. We build knowledge service priorities – capabilities to develop the library service plan.

We use user experience stories, surveys and space planning diagrams to understand the knowledge management interactions and user needs. We develop libraries with the behavioral workflow patterns in mind. Below is an outline of our work.

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Library Functions in an Accelerated World

In an age of constant acceleration, Thomas Friedman is a Futurist who sees radical changes in our information landscape. In his book, Thank you for Being Late, he suggests that we need to empower innovation to establish radically disruptive new business models.

Our research shows that libraries need to be updated faster. They should provide services that are fast, free, easy to use, and ubiquitous. Indeed, library technology needs to move from the 2007 model of “invisible services” to those that are visible and allow for collaboration and sharing. This means that the next generation of librarians will provide access to both physical and digital platforms. Both require information architecture to support modern day users with business analysis, teaching and learning, and lifelong learning pursuits.

Throughout our 45 year history, our Library Consultant has stressed that planning should be forward-thinking. Today, we are trying to understand how the library can function in an accelerated world. What will this look like? What are the decisions to make that ensure the library will evolve and grow?

Our group of librarians, IT professionals and architectural planners help our clients examine and redefine a library’s staff, collections and user space. To help clarify these concepts, Aaron Cohen built our consulting firm on the notion that we must prototype (what is a good library?) first and compare our ideas with the local user requirements. Our ability to define collection conditions at other libraries make this exercise worthwhile to our clients. We learn from our past ideas and build new types of library services in response to our rapidly changing world.

A recent example of this analysis: we reviewed the impact of IBM Watson developer cloud & EEG signaling technology to learn how to extend library services into the data-enhanced AI world. These new types of libraries will help corporations use their databases with APIs to improve marketing, finance and sales. These new types of digital library services will use technology to help businesses understand the data they collect and learn how to use it; they will require both collection development and staff development to make them work. Contact us—we can help!

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