Posts Tagged library consultants

NYPL Library Planning – looking toward the future..

The NYPL is a unique library institution with a historical research component as well as a public center of culture in New York. Over the years, the public library has evolved into a “culture house” – a place for community gathering, electronic collaboration and cultural programming/events. However, digital projects live everywhere! This extreme decentralization of library and information services adversely affects the value of the library building i.e. when it looses touch with the strategy the building was designed to support.

In Renderings for a Library Landmark, Stacks of Questions, Norman Fosters design for the renovation of Manhattan’s 42nd Street branch of the New York Public Library is taking a bad rap. In this age of the Internet and e-books, libraries must change if they are to survive. No one wants to support an institution that does not offer collaborative space, research services and facilities to enhance culture – in this case New York City, the Big Apple and the Melting Pot.

Although they were once important aspects of New York Public Library’s organization, the time has passed for the Mid-Manhattan and Business Libraries. Library services and culture has changed; so the design strategy must change. We say this even though Aaron Cohen, AIA and Elaine Cohen, Ed were once authors of an architectural program for a major expansion of the Mid-Manhattan Library and on the team that evaluated the pros and cons of the storage facility under Bryant Park before it was constructed.

Below are examples of Norman Fosters work – the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. It is an example of the grand space Norman Foster will design to enhance the 42nd street library.

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The library planning equation and the NYPL example – The library of the future is part Bookstore, MakerSpace and Culture House

The Library is still defined as a place that holds knowledge. We noted today that books are still part of the library planning equation. According to Libraries See Opening as Bookstores Close – NY Times December 27th article by KAREN ANN CULLOTTA – “As librarians across the nation struggle with the task of redefining their roles and responsibilities in a digital age, many public libraries are seeing an opportunity to fill the void created by the loss of traditional bookstores.

The library will always be a space with books, knowledge resources (librarians), training, programs and quiet reading spaces. However, the spaces being allocated to books are being redefined, which makes our work challenging.

Books are still and will always be a knowledge tool of choice for many people. We recognize this fact as we plan tomorrows library collections. We also plan that libraries will be MakerSpaces and Culture Houses and Bookstores of the future. These strategies will continue to be priorities in our planning for 2013.

The ‘library is a place’ that should offer culture, knowledge tools and space to use for digital bits and physical atoms. Indeed, it will need to support all options for research.

The new library plan for the NYPL is a very exciting concept with new space designed for learning activities. The big challenge for the NYPL is to create a blended learning environment, not just a vast open room full of computers, but also spaces with books, media and historical resources. Flexible areas with movable partitions and bookstacks with books to check out need to be integrated into Foster’s plan.

Click on the link below – it is an impressive flyover of the new library planned for NYPL by Norman Foster…
NYPL – Library Plan

 

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Creating Learning Spaces Through Collaboration – The Library is a 3rd Place to Consider

The way students are learning with technology and the availability of social media is a change from the traditional lecture style class. Many complain that the PowerPoint Lectures do not work and that faculty should expand their knowledge of instructional technology to make the classes more engaging. The faculty resources center concept, a part of our programming model for the academic library, is important innovation in library space planning.

In the Chronicle of Higher Education, “Lecture Fail? Students and Professors Sound Off on the State of the College Lecture,” students sound off about the way that some professors teach their course and the professors respond. They are having a conversation using social media. They point to a shared goal – develop a 3rd place for learning to occur – THE LIBRARY.

The Georgia Tech Library underwent a series of learning space renovations in the past six years ending in 2009. There are good photos of an academic library that can be used to explore innovative library spaces.

During planning at GT, library staff did a lot of work trying to understand the need for collaboration. They prototyped new 3rd spaces for students to work. However, the Educause article, “Creating Learning Spaces Through Collaboration” illustrated a lack of understanding before implementation. The article states, “while we were unsure if we had correctly guessed what students required in the space, we were lucky in that the end product was highly successful with students.”

We believe that a solid methodology that strives for innovation can eliminate the “luck” in the process. The analysis allows for faculty, students and library staff to explore options outside of their control.

Recommendations for Library Planners

During the transition from the old to new library space, the library planning committee should seek common ground. They should have conversations about the discovery process and explore the types of physical and virtual library services that will be in the building.

Without planning, “luck” is all we can expect from our work. It’s nice to have good intentions, but it is invaluable for stakeholders to have input. When the administration shares the need to explore a change in the library or learning space(s) start by determining the needs of the community, and look for ways to adapt technology. Outline the physical and virtual spaces required to enable your library community to succeed.

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Evaluation Methods for Library Space

There are complex, complicated and simple library building projects. Our clients typically ask us:

  • How much space do we need?
  • How much does it cost?
  • How long will it take?
  • How many stakeholders should we interview?
  • How satisfied are the stakeholders?
  • ACA’s approach incorporates a quantitative analysis of library services and operations. This is done with a series of survey instruments that capture customer data (visits, temperature, humidity control, # of seats, # of computers, # of staff, type & # of collections). The outcome is a building program of library services including user seating, collection, staff and operations.

    This blog is focused on the Narrative Evaluation of Library Space, Services and Operations.

  • Complex Areas of Research:
      E-resources and E-tools, Curriculum Development, Collection Development.
  • Chaotic Areas of Research:
      Technologies that Transform Learning and Education Environments.
  • Simple Areas of Research:
      ACA’s Best Practices in Library Building Planning.
  • Complicated Areas of Library Research:
      Analysis of Building Designs, Space Plan, Flow and Use of Resources.

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