• Library Planning Research

    Library Programming – Working to Optimize Student User Experience

    We know that the library must position itself differently in the 21st century. The books and spaces are part of the library building, but the library is also the primary non-classroom academic space on campus. It supports the student life cycle needs including the development of research assets and research skills. According to Educause Top 10 Library / IT Trends for 2020, optimizing the user experience is an important trend in library science.

    When students arrive on any campus, they are looking for guidance on how to be successful. If they find the library as a destination, they are likely to succeed at their grades and graduate on time. So, it is important for academic libraries to create an environment that enables students to be supported early in their studies. And as their college career unfolds, offer work environments and start up group work spaces.

    When we develop a library program it includes high-quality collaboration spaces with and without technology. The academic resources spaces we including in our building programs include tutoring, writing, math, science center space. They are strongly linked with academic programs on campus, creating opportunities for student success.

    LOOKING FORWARD TO 2020

    In 2020, we will see more demand for individual study spaces as midterms and exams approach. In 2019, we were shocked by the amount of students who found that the library didn’t have enough space during mid terms or enough group spaces for project based work. It strengthened our resolve to re-balance our library programming, offering libraries more flexible / adaptable spaces.

    Our latest strategy is to develop library service programs that allow our clients to build the digital services and a improve the physical user experience. Indeed, we provide academic library space programs and service planning for librarians. We also develop master plans that allows our clients, for example, to change their learning environments from group spaces to individual work areas – configured for individual achievement when the semester requires and offered as a group space during the semester.

    WORKING WITH IT and FACILITIES TO CREATE DIGITAL EXPERIENCES

    We have been working on the library’s user experience and the challenges posed by IT and facilities for a long time. Our research has shown that all users need the same type of library information services including access to e-resources and databases. But they really need digital asset management skills, tools and training i.e. working with content and data creation tools. This issue is important for the library to plan for now, because the library needs to be known as a central destination for basic content and data science skills building. Many of our clients need digital asset management systems to support both researcher and small business / start up development on campus. Librarians can help in this area.

    How are libraries working with the IT organization to optimize students’ experiences?

    1. Develop a shared project with IT

    2. Analyze how digital asset management can be deployed to support student/researcher content generation and management.

    3. Develop a plan to improve your library services by investing in behavior learning space analysis and programming. Create a plan for the libraries space to be used to the maximum – what are students doing in the space and what digital resources are available for students to create their own research portal.

    4. Develop a plan to improve your user experience – if that means creating a digital asset management system to help manage scholarly research, start with a prototype and build the future.

    5. Create a master library plan that includes both library space and service needs.

    Today’s library is a social space, and a place to work collaboratively. It provides spaces to focus on your class work, but it is also built on a library collection. There are different types of collection development activities and different space needs for different users. In 2020, this trend will continue and librarians who build a bridge between these services will be successful on campus. Below is an example of a Rose State Community College tutor waiting for a student to work on a project. It is an example of the support librarians provide to students in the library.

    CONTACT LIBRARY CONSULTANT

  • Library Planning Research

    It’s all about the library user experience…

    It’s never been easier for libraries to improve services – or so it seems. Open, adaptable, activity-based library spaces make people feel like they are part of the community. On the other hand, a recent Harvard Review Study by Ethan S. Bernstein (the truth about open offices) suggests that open offices reduce collaboration. We understand this problem. We analyze library use and find that people are doing more online learning, making zoom or gotomeeting calls requiring new types of libraries to support their needs.

    When did messaging displace phone calls? I don’t remember, but today’s work environment is filled with people texting and communicating. Sometimes person to person conversations are being replaced by a simple text. And Google, Slack and Microsoft now offer collaboration services displacing in-person meetings. How will the libraries respond to this new type of communication? How will the environment be affected?

    We are all living in real time and our physical and technology structures have changed our ability to experience our environments. We now communicate with multi-channel collaboration tools. In the future, we will be activating our space using AI, robots, NFC applications, blockchain systems and smart phones to seamlessly share our activities, relationships and experiences.

    Library Architecture is easy to observe if you understand the context and content of the user experience. There are reasons why library programming is needed. We understand how to define the behavior and help program the services/spaces for the desired interactions. Organically thinking, these individual behaviors together make up an anatomy of service responses – learning support, literacy, digital knowledge and cultural awareness.

    When designing the future try to understand how your library supports the face-to-face meeting, video conferencing, cell phone calls, social media, email, and messaging needs of the user. Are there places for people to do these things? Do you need to analyze our collections, seating and staff spaces? Is it time to make a plan?


  • Library Planning Research,  Space Planning

    Appreciative Inquiry and Library Planning

    Appreciative Inquiry has been described as an affirmative approach to change management. It is a cooperative search for the best parts of the library building, service and organization. It involves a systematic discovery of what gives a library or library system life.

    Aaron Cohen Associates, LTD applies this concept on both small- and large-scale library projects. We follow the following steps to determine the existing conditions of a library and its future needs:

    1. Discover: We provide workshops on library planning, engaging stakeholders in a series of workshops. We study the potential for positive change and seek to understand the culture and character of the library. Our questions help reveal the present state and the future potential.
    2. Dream: Our plans start as a bubble diagram suggesting proximity and relative sizes of areas. What gives life to this area? What functions need to be adjacent? How much space should be allowed for different services?
    3. Design: Library plans will show the footprint: the area that the library occupies on the site. Some architects will show book stacks, tables, chairs and staff work equipment at this stage. We call these program tests.
    4. Deliver: A Library Service Planis a vital planning tool. Ideally, each piece of furniture and equipment is drawn on the plan in an early phase, since shapes of functional areas are often set at this stage. Capacities for books and seating in each functional area is calculated and approved by the library director, staff, administration, etc.

    Here are some sample questions to ask when reviewing a plan:

    • When users enter the library, can they understand the layout?
    • What are the strengths of the space?
    • Are books visible and arranged in a clear and simple order?
    • What are the existing conditions? What works?
    • Are functions arranged so that you walk through the noisy area to the quiet area?
    • What is the best part of the library?

    CONTACT US

    library consultant planning process

  • Library Planning Research,  Space Planning

    The Library’s Newest Role: Remote Office

    Libraries serve an important role in today’s digital world: they offer a work space for those without a traditional office. Collaboration is a key service used by today’s patrons. Shared work space, such as WeWork, provides startups and small businesses with the tools for success; libraries can offer the same service in their communities. Library consultants help you determine the potential of your information services.

    According to Medium.com,  Library Visits Have Gone Way Up Over the Last Two Decades.Many people do not have a traditional office, but need the amenities and tools of the modern world: computers, wi-fi, printers, scanners and meeting space. Corporations and governments are rethinking the working environment; libraries should respond by developing a responsive library service program.

    Library consultants help you understand the requirements for different users and outline the strategies to increase the value of services. Most importantly, such a program can help meet the needs of the groups and individuals in the community. We always look to future needs, because change is constant in our world. A lot of people want to know how to do library programming; besides service point / touch point (circulation/reference desk) services, library consultants help define digital components, web sites, branding, research services, ILL, makespaces, STEM and much more.

    Certainly, the impact of sustainable collection strategies and the use of data to create more responsive library services is a trend in library science. Indeed, we strive to incorporate new library service standards into our work. This includes new strategies that leverage information provided by  GreenGlass and Hathitrust. More detailed data means we can program responsive spaces, adding new ideas like STEM programs and accessible work space.

    FOR MORE INFO ABOUT OUR SERVICES – Contact Us

     

  • Library Planning Research

    The Library Program: a Vital First Step in Design

    Aaron Cohen Associates’  library programs have improved the design of libraries worldwide, integrating architecture, IT and service. A program is the first step in the conceptual design process; it is vital to give it time and attention. As part of our program work, we build connections between people, facilitate workshops and offer solutions for space and service challenges. 

    A library program outlines where seating, computers, lounge seats and group study area are placed. They also show where the library provides circulation and reference services. The seating spaces can be social, collaborative, or quiet and have adaptable furniture.

    The library program can have a profound influence on the quality of your library environment. It is important that a program is adaptable, able to respond to the changing needs of patrons. In addition, careful choices of furniture and lighting can enhance and modernize your space. Here are some factors to consider when developing a program:

    • Make sure your program and planning documents are easy to read and free from complex solutions.
    • If you are considering new seating, test the library space. We recommend self-sustaining scenarios/solutions and interventions. Demo the furniture, ask users what they think, run a library planning workshop, etc.
    • Ensure your library design accentuates natural light and fresh air.
    • Try to incorporate flexible, stackable furniture and moveable walls to maximize flexibility. Spaces should serve multiple purposes when possible.
    • Avoid fabrics, soft furnishings and broad-loom carpets; these materials make it harder to keep the library clean.
    • Use a variety of lighting: spotlights, up-lighters and diffused lighting controlled with dimmer switches can provide flexibility for different functions.
    • Provide book walls with plenty of new books to add more energy to your library.
    • Organize sufficient storage space to keep all equipment, last copy and special collections, so that work surfaces are clear and free.
    • Ask lots of questions, listen to your users and explore their vision.
  • Library Planning Research,  work in progress

    Aaron Cohen Library Consultant Experience

    Despite being just 47 years ago, Aaron Cohen Associates, Ltd has snagged commissions in high-profile library projects that any consulting business in the world would envy.

    Few firms of a comparable size have worked in three continents, and Alex Cohen, MLS (library consultant) is aware of the benefits of having worked around the world; The Cohen’s credit their library, archive and IT planning experiences with bringing awareness to user needs, bold methodologies that provide data / information and a diversity of experiences that help solve problems for our clients.

    The firm was founded in 1972 by Aaron Cohen, AIA and Elaine Cohen, Med, where the two developed an architectural design business. Their firms first project was a library planning workshop for the federal government. Soon after they went on to develop over 1,000 academic, public, school, government and special libraries — and there the practice grew to include their son Alex Cohen, MLS . The team is based in the New York Hudson Valley with clients around the world.

    Aaron Cohen Associates, LTD frequently experiments with library architecture and IT solutions, a theme we focus on includes adaptive library design — Aaron Cohen Associates, LTD – 5 modes of learning and user characterization studies keeps it fresh by staying pragmatically flexible i.e. we design our models based on the behavior of the user.

  • Library Planning Research,  library technology,  work in progress

    Is Your Digital System Draining Productivity?

    Modern organizations often pride themselves on usage of digital material—but poor management of IT content  and digital knowledge resources can actually reduce productivity. Some IT databases are not designed for today’s communication needs, and user interfaces can be confusing. Despite being “modern,” these systems do not automatically improve productivity. 

    Our library consulting team can perform an IT healthcheck. Our planning methodology can be applied to reorganizing digital assets, just as we help our clients reorganize physical space. We can support the end user regardless of whether the library is physical or virtual.

    As with a physical space, the IT systems require regular review. Are they serving the user? Are they as efficient and effective as they should be? An IT healthcheck will help your team to better serve your company’s objectives. 

    We can provide an assessment and recommendations that will simplify complex IT systems. We can offer short-term gains and define long-term improvements to the IT database, platform and system. 

    Contact us today to get started!

    IT Healthcheck – Contact Aaron Cohen Associates, LTD

  • Library Planning Research,  Social Library Issues,  work in progress

    Improve the Library, Improve the Community

    Libraries have long been the heart of the communities they serve.  Eric Klinenberg is a pioneer promoting such social infrastructure as a way to improve lives. As author of Palaces for the People, he has come to the same conclusion that we have in our 47-year history planning libraries: if you build new libraries, communities grow and thrive.

    Sometimes it seems impossible to get support for the local library; funds are often tight, and people have a negative view of the space, creating a vicious cycle. Restricted library funding can have real consequences, including underdeveloped children’s and teen services. This in turn affects the youths’ ability to network, thrive in their community and grow into well-rounded individuals. Kids may just “hang out” in the street or get chased away from public areas like stores or parks. Eric Klinenberg analyzes this problem and offers examples of the public library as a solution. The library offers kids a “third place” and a shared home away from home. This reduces their isolation and improves the community.

    Part of providing this social infrastructure is designing spaces that allow for various activities: quiet work, social interaction and so on. Aaron Cohen Associates’ Five Modes of Learning Workshops provide a platform to analyze how people use library spaces and how they may be improved to support more activities. It offers guidance on how to distribute the library functions in a manageable pattern, using behavior as an underlying guide for the design.

    To determine where the behavioral modes fit into the library, we use a hands-on method called the Visual Scan. Together the five modes of learning and Visual Scan enables our team to create innovations including more group study spaces and flexible, collaborative areas.

    Tomorrow, November 30th, we will host a workshop in NYC at Steelcase. We will examine how we can redefine the library experience. Join us! – CLICK HERE –

  • Library Planning Research,  Space Planning,  work in progress

    Save Space and Add More Seats to Your Library

    Does your library need to re-balance its print collections?

    Do you need a small repository to increase the library’s seating count?

    How can libraries increase space utilization and improve service?  In our early days, Aaron Cohen Associates programmed library buildings to hold a lot of books. To meet ACRL storage standards, a library consultant was normally hired to determine the number of linear feet of shelving required for the library. Simply put, we helped determine the amount of books a new or existing library building could hold.

    At that time, improving service meant increasing circulation. But in the 2000s a paradigm shift occurred: the Internet, smart phones and cafes emerged. As a result, the libraries’ service declined: the amount of active space was restricted, and passive print shelving and circulation flat-lined. In the modern library, shelving is giving way to an increase in space: for collaboration, for study, for programs.

    But what to do with the books patrons still need? Automated print storage could be the answer: units can be built for small and large budgets, either horizontal or vertical. Solutions can be designed to take advantage of the cubic feet available. Storage is also essential for Fighting Format Rot, according to David Pogue. With the right system, libraries can save old formats, scan them and store them before they are discarded and lost.

    The trend toward active learning should extend to the collections: libraries have added writing centers, learning centers and math centers, and more open space. However, collections remain passive: housed on open shelving, taking up valuable learning spaces.

    Below is an example of a product that can be used for vertical storage. This is just an example to help you to start to learn how you can save space and add more seats to your library. Contact us to determine your library’s options.

  • Library Planning Research,  work in progress

    Library Planning – Knowledge Mapping Using the 5 Modes

    A few days ago, one of our senior consultants got a call from a research library in need of a new vision. The library organization structure was outdated and staff/employees were focusing on tasks that were not a priority. The need for improvement was obvious to the administration. Services for the researchers needed to improve – there was a miss-match in the services and operations of the library.

    The objective of any knowledge organization is to improve the way users access the collection. What is the touch point? is it physical or digital? What kinds of activities would you like the library staff to focus on?

    By developing a services and operations program, you can start to define better ways to make an impact on your community. You can develop a knowledge map program to gain user insights, increase access to resources and enhance library services. The idea is to increase the resources your library has to offer in a managed, phased and structured approach.

    Our program model for a library uses five different modes for learning as a starting point.

    1. Reflective
    2. Collaborative
    3. Social
    4. Presentation
    5. Touch Point

    A successful library builds on these areas to ensure both the physical library and the digital one can exceed expectations.